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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
. we will be live from pentagon in a minute. >>> and falling from space, wow, pretty cool, at a rate of more than 843 miles per hour, that's how fast dare devil felix baumgartner fell when he jumped from space. the official speed has been released. even faster now than those record keepers thought at first. pretty cool stuff. >>> one of our top stories today at cnn, a secret american drone base somewhere in saudi arabia, now this is according, these are reports from two major newspapers today, saying that this u.s. launches these drone attacks against al qaeda targets from that particular base. i want to bring in two folks here at the pentagon chris lawrence also michael holmes from cnn international. chris, it's not a total surprise that this was there in saudi arabia, but certainly it was not something that they officially wanted to reveal. why are they doing it now? >> that's the big question, suzanne, why did this come out? we reported two years ago from our sources u.s. officials were telling us the cia was building an airstrip in the a arabian peninsula. it was hinted it would
in syria. the plan was directed by david petraeus and backed by pentagon leaders and secretary of state hillary clinton. the white house had doubts which rebels could be trusted with the arms. those details came to light during a senate hearing on libya and republicans had some tough questions for panetta, who revealed he and president obama spoke once during the eight-hour benghazi attack that left four americans dead and explained why the pentagon didn't send any war planes. >> reporter: the reason planes were not launched the attack came in two waves in two different locations and after the first wave ended after about an hour and a half they all thought it was over plus he said there wasn't enough actionable intelligence on the ground to act. >> you can't just willy-nilly send f-16s there and blow the hell out of a place without knowing what's taking place. >> reporter: under questioning by republicans secretary panetta and the joint chiefs of staff martin dempsey say they were aware in the months before attack u.s. ambassador chris stevens was worried about s
who is going to be running the pentagon. >> sam? >> well, i slightly disagree with robert. >> i thought you might. >> you know, actually it's funny because some of these questions did produce interesting illustrative answers. for instance when ron johnson got hk to say what difference does it make? well, it does make a difference. the problem i found with the questions was they ended up stepping on the news. they became so dem mon stra tiff and so theatrical that they ended up stealing the spotlight from the answers. that did a disservice in some respects to the question. >> is the real story the feeder of the questions or hagel's fumbling perform snens i think it's the latter. i think hagel had a dismal performance at that hearing. did he seem competent to run the pentagon? there were a lot of questions even among democrats after that hearing whether he's ready. >> i don't disagree with that. i think hagel had a really poor performance. what i'm say something for these senators -- if you looked at what ted cruz was asking about, association with an israeli diplomat that basical
: for the first time, pentagon leaders said today they had supported arming the rebels in syria. defense secretary leon panetta and general martin dempsey chair of the joint chiefs said they made that recommendation to president obama. panetta told a senate hearing that, in the end, the president decided against sending in arms. instead, the u.s. has provided only humanitarian aid to the rebels. secretary panetta also defended the military's response to the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. the assault killed ambassador chris stevens and three other americans. panetta testified there'd been no specific warning of an imminent attack, so u.s. forces were too far away to respond. >> the united states military, as i've said, is not and frankly should not be a 911 service capable of arriving on the scene within minutes to every possible contingency around the world. the u.s. military has neither the resources nor the responsibility to have a firehouse next to every u.s. facility in the world. >> sreenivasan: republican senator john mccain of arizona argued the military could have deploye
it calls "non- lethal" assistance. and with panetta's departure from the pentagon today, plus clinton's last week and petraeus's resignation in 2012, general dempsey is the only known remaining advocate of arming the rebels still in a top advisory role. i'm joined who served in the obama administration state departments and is now dean of the school of advanced international studies at johns hopkins university. and andrew tabler, a senior fellow at the washington institute for near east policy. what were the main schools of thought. how did the camps break down in this argument inside the administration on what to do about syria, andrew? >> basically you have a discussion about syria about all the different options. and it really comes down to this. the white house was hedgingment they really did not want to get involved in syria. they have a firm policy to stay out of the middle east and would like to pull back. at the same time the agencies that deal with syria and the problem there, which is growing and mushrooming, the state department, cia and to a certain extent the department o
, if you will. we do have an opportunity to talk to several people within the pentagon and what we found we were very disappointed by was that they weren't taking the steps that they really needed to take to address this problem. >> brown: is this for you an act of... is it journalism? is it art? i mean it's film making. how do you see what your doing? >> well, i guess i see myself as an artist. but as an artist i think you take on the greatest challenge you can. to put all these things together, the art, film making, journalism into one, i see it as an artistic enterprise but at the same time, of course, when you're dealing with this kind of subject, you have to be very journalistically precise which we were. but it's a challenge. i mean this film was being made actually for two audiences. one was for the film making audience. it's been very successful. it was nominated for academy award. it's won many audience awards but it was also made for policy makers in washington d.c. >> brown: you had them in mind absolutely. i remember cut by cut we'd be thinking, this will play to an audience but
to take effect. it will impact virtually every major agency in washington. the pentagon could see roughly half of the reductions and that has republicans upset. >> we're going to begin to unravel the finest military in the history of the world at a time when we need it most. >> reporter: mandatory cuts in domestic spending could also hit americans hard. there could be furloughs of food safety employees, leading to a shortage of meat poultry and eggs and pushing up food prices. 50,000 tsa workers could see their hours cut back that would mean longer security lines for air travelers, and more than 350,000 people who need mental health treatment could be denied. hundreds of thousands of government workers from teachers to federal law enforcement agents are likely to be furloughed. many republicans admit the sequester isn't ideal, but they insist cuts have to be made. >> let me be very clear and i say this to the president as i say it to you, these spending cuts are going to go through on march 1st. >> reporter: the white house warns the cuts would get phased in just a
is going to the other side. that said when he is in the pentagon and controls the military in that capacity, they will have to deal with him and have the same interest in common. both parties want to keep the u.s. strong and safe and chuck hagel has been through worse. believe me, he has seen much more incoming than at that hearing. >> republican strategist, good to see you. thank you. >> good to see you. >> still ahead on the saturday afternoon, the latest on the scandal around the top u.s. senator. first, on this date, an announcement that led to the moment so many had been calling for. eventually to the end of apartheid. you are watching msnbc the place for politics. but don't worry, he'll find someone else. ♪ who's that lady? ♪ who's that lady? ♪ sexy lady, who's that lady? [ female announcer ] swiffer 360 dusters extender cleans high and low, with thick all around fibers that attract and lock up to two times more dust than a feather duster. swiffer gives cleaning a whole new meaning. and now swiffer dusters refills are available with the fresh scent of gain. i just served my moth
's the complement of non -- of folks from the state department that we send? the relationship between the pentagon and the state department seems to have changed as well. how will he weigh in on that? >> yeah, those are good questions. i think if i could just take two examples. with syria and also with afghanistan, you have questions of where the united states has to figure out some next policy steps that are pretty big and get to the question you raise, the balance between troops possibly, between diplomatic advisers, development experts, cia operatives, and where policy in the case of afghanistan has to make some changes, but it's generally on a predetermined course but it's going to have to vary quite a bit because we're drawing down troops now. in syria i think what we have is a policy for all the good intentions hasn't really worked. and if i were secretary kerry, i would probably commission my best people to do a two to four-week study on fundamentally new options in syria. where i think the united states has to recognize that what it's been doing so far hasn't been adequate and yet the coun
you briefly, if you would, because given the kind of changes you are talk pentagon, people paying online, for example. where is this headed? does the american public have to get used to a lesser service and perhaps at some point the end of the postal service? >> no, not at all. we think the future is very bright, as long as you take the steps to get the financein order. our plan-- our plan has us getting back in the black and paying the debt down. now, will there be changes? absolutely. some of the changes we discussed already. we have already made plenty of changes. since the year 2000, this organization, the postal service has reducedly the head count-- head count, payroll, not jobs or job descriptions, payroll-- by 305,000 employees, 193,000 since 2008. we have-- our people do a great job. they're very productive. we have done anything and everything in our power to try to catch up to the loss that we've got in volume. people say, suggest we raise prices dramatically. that chase more volume away. we are trying to take a very business-like approach. we think it's a win-win. ever
in the state department or the pentagon are there. i think at some point the united states government and the white house have to make a decision that syria is an actual danger to america's national security interests. it is not something we can wash our hands from. and there are serious dangers and implications to the united states and the president actually to ask its national security team for realistic options that then he request gather his team and debate and decide about. there hasn't, i think, been a serious debate even with thunited stasgovernment as to what might be our three top options what are the costs and benefits of each. and if we were to pursue one of them, how would we do it. >> is there a legitimate argument that this destabilizes turkey to some degree, an important country to the united states, and a nato ally, andrew. >> absolutely. thousands of syrians go over the border into turkey every day. and it's very easy for pkk fighters, kurdish fighters to meld into those refugees, to go across the border and carry out terrorists attacks insidef tuey. no government in
as the secretary steps up the rhetoric about dire cuts at the pentagon if sequestration goes into effect march 1. >>> the man accused of trying to blow up the federal reserve in new york expected to plead guilty to terror charges. officials say he tried to blow up the van with 1,000 pounds of explosives outside the buildings, but the explosives were fake. he is charged with trying to use weapons of mass destruction and trying to thwart al qaeda. >> there are thousands of reasons why people are late to work. traffic? the most common culprit. but not all employees blame jammed roads. a new survey reveals some of the most memorable excuses like -- good ideas for you. my car wouldn't start because the breathalyzer showed i was intoxicated. my car was attacked by a bear. here's the photo of proof. are we going to see it? >>steve: we heard it. >>gretchen: last but not least, my angry wife froze my keys in a glass of water in the freezer. come on. out of those three, that is the most logical one. >>brian: really? i tell you what, i think there is a long line of misdeeds if she is going to that extent t
on that "washington post" article that came out recently. it did suggest that the pentagon is pushing a plan that we keep on about 8000 troops in afghanistan. i know that general austin, you weren't a part of the planning process thus far, but can you supported plan that would scheduled withdrawal of troops in advance? you know, we are looking at withdrawal of troops in afghanistan, and according to this article from about 8000 down to 1000 within a very short period of time. i have questions if we can even maintain our mission, let alone complete the mission. how can you make decisions on troop withdrawal when, as you stated previously, so much depends upon conditions on the ground, what the government is doing, what their abilities are up to that point. how would you approach a proposal like that? >> i certainly would first really work hard to make sure i fully understood what the leadership wanted to get done moving into the future. and i certainly, my advice as a commander on the ground or commander of central command, i would provide my advice based upon where i think the security forces are, a
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)